By her: marinated chicken & cucumber

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Recipe adapted from Just One Cookbook

Ingredients

1 cucumber

3 chicken thigh with/without skin

For seasoning A

1/4 cup water

2 tbsp sake

1 tsp salt

For seasoning B

1/4 cup soy sauce

4 1/2 tbsp sugar

2 tbsp mirin

2 tbsp sesame oil

1 tsp sake

Instructions

1. Discard both ends of the cucumbers and peel the skin, leaving some part unpeeled for the look.

2. Cut the cucumbers in “rangiri style”, making long, thin diagonal cuts while rotating one-quarter between every cut.

3. Cut the chicken into bite-sized pieces.

4. Place the chicken in a frying pan skin side down and add Seasoning A.

5. Cover and start cooking over medium heat. Simmer for 2 minutes, then turn the chicken over and continue simmering covered for 2 minutes. Turn off the heat.

6. Continue cooking with the remaining heat and make sure the chicken is cooked through.

7. Combine Seasoning B in a large air tight container.

8. Remove the warm chicken from the pan and add in the container.

9. Add the cucumber and mix well. Let marinate for at least 10 minutes. You can keep it in the refrigerator for up to 2-3 days. Serve cool or at room temperature.

Serves 2.

By her: teriyaki chicken & rice

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Recipe from 8 days

Ingredients

4 tbsp soy sauce

4 tbsp mirin

1 tbsp sugar

2 tbsp sake

2 chicken thigh fillets

1/2 tbsp vegetable oil

1 cup cooked white rice

Instructions

1. Place soy sauce, miring, sugar and sake in a bowl. Mix and marinade for at least 20 minutes or overnight.

2. Preheat oven to 200 degrees C.

3. Line a baking tray with foil.

4. Remove chicken thigh fillets and brush with oil. Pour the marinade over the chicken.

5. Place fillets on the foil-lined tray and bake for 20 to 25 minutes. Tip: to determine if the chicken is cooked, prick it with a fork. The juice should run clear.

6. Serve on top of steamed white rice.

Serves 2.

 

 

By him: snapper en papillote

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Recipe adapted from Chef Danny Grant, a two-starred Michelin chef at the Elysian Hotel in Chicago  (relish.com)
Ingredients
14g + 7g butter, divided
2  cups button mushrooms
2  cloves garlic, minced
1/2  bunch scallions, whites part sliced, greens left whole
2  filets snapper (halibut, black cod, or salmon, any fish)
1/2  bulb fennel, sliced in 16ths
1/2  cup chicken stock
2  tbsp olive oil
2  sprigs thyme
2 slices lemon
 
Instructions
1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees C.
2. Melt 1 tablespoons butter in a small skillet; add mushrooms and sauté until lightly coloured. Add garlic and scallion whites; cook for 3 minutes until tender and remove from heat.
3. Season the fish with salt, pepper and top with lemon slices. 
4. Spread out two pieces of parchment paper and brush the paper with remaining butter. 
5. Divide all ingredients among 2 different sheets of parchment paper (being careful not to let the stock and olive oil spill) and top with the fish.
6. Wrap up the fish using the parchment paper. Bake for 13 minutes. Remove, unwrap the parchment paper and serve.
Tip: this can sit in the fridge for up to four hours until ready to bake. 
 
Serves 2.
 

“En papillote (French for “in parchment”), or al cartoccio in Italian, is a method of cooking in which the food is put into a folded pouch or parcel and then baked.  The parcel is typically made from folded parchment paper, but other material, such as a paper bag or aluminium foil, may be used. The parcel holds in moisture to steam the food. The pocket is created by overlapping circles of aluminum foil and parchment paper and then folding them tightly around the food to create a seal. A papillote should be opened at the table to allow people to smell the aroma when it opens.

The moisture may be from the food itself or from an added moisture source, such as water, wine, or stock.

This method is most often used to cook fish or vegetables, but lamb and  poultry can also be cooked en papillote. Choice of herbs, seasonings and spices depend on the particular recipe being prepared.

The pouch should be sealed with careful folding.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia

 

By him: potato aligot

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Recipe adapted from Easy French Food 
Ingredients
225g potatoes
20g butter
1/4 cup creme fraiche
1/2 clove garlic, minced or pressed
110g tomme cheese, sliced in small strips
Tip 1: DO NOT grate the cheese thinking it will incorporate more rapidly.
 
Instructions
1. Cook the potatoes in boiling water until quite tender (about 20 to 25 minutes).Peel and mash the potatoes.
2. Place a pot on low heat and place the potatoes in this. Using a wooden spoon, begin gradually and vigorously stirring in the cheese bit by bit. Stir in the creme fraiche, butter and garlic.
Tip 2: traditional aligot recipes will tell you to form figure eights while you are doing this, but circle work fine as well. 
Tip 3: keep the heat low as you are adding the cheese. The goal is to keep things just warm enough so that the cheese melts but you don’t want to be cooking anything here.
3. Continue stirring until the potatoes come away from the sides of the pan and you get long smooth ribbons when you lift the spoon through the potatoes. The whole process of incorporating the cheese will take about 10 to 15  minutes.
4. Serve immediately.
 
Serves 2.
 

Aligot is a dish made from melted cheese blended into mashed potatoes (often with some garlic) that is made in L’Aubrac region in southern Massif Central of France. This fondue-like dish from the Aveyron department is a common sight in Auvergne restaurants. Traditionally made with the Tomme de Laguiole or Tomme d’Auvergne cheese, aligot is a French country speciality highly appreciated in the local gastronomy with Toulouse sausages or roast pork. Other cheeses are used in place of Tomme, including mozzarella and cantal. The Laguiole cheese imparts a nutty flavour.

Aligot is made from mashed potatoes blended with butter, cream, crushed garlic, and the melted cheese. The dish is ready when it develops a smooth, elastic texture. 

This dish was originally made using bread by monks, who prepared it for the pilgrims on the way to Santiago de Compostela who stopped for a night in that region. Potatoes were substituted after their introduction to France. Today, it is enjoyed for village gatherings and celebrations as a main dish. Aligot is still cooked by hand in Aveyron, at home as well as in street markets. Aligot is traditionally served with Auvergne red wine.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia

By her: unagi & cucumber sushi // seaweeed // cucumber with furikake

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Recipe for grilled unagi
Ingredient
1 fillet of whole unagi (eel)
Instructions
1. Line baking tray with aluminium foil. Place unagi on top.
2. Without preheating, put the baking tray  in the middle rack of the oven, and broil on high for 7 minutes (no need to flip).
3. After 7 minutes or so, take it out