By him: mussels with blue cheese & white wine

Recipe from Citrus and Candy
Ingredients
1/2 Tbsp / 7.5ml olive oil
7.5g unsalted butter
1/2 small leek, halved lengthways and sliced thinly
1 cloves garlic, finely chopped
90ml dry white wine
60g creamy blue cheese, rind removed (Australian Shadows of Blue from Gippsland)
90ml cream
750g mussels, washed, scrubbed, beards removed and left to strain in a colander
Handful of chives or parsley, chopped
 
Instructions
  1. Heat up the oil and butter in a wok or large pan over medium heat. Sauté leek and garlic for about 5 minutes or until vegetables have softened.
  2. Deglaze with the wine, cook for a minute then add the blue cheese and stir until completely melted. Stir through the cream, bring to a boil then toss the mussels through. Stick on the lid and cook for about 5 minutes, shaking the pan occasionally until the mussels have opened up.
  3. Remove mussels with a slotted spoon into serving bowls (discard any unopened mussels). Cook sauce until reduced by a third and check for seasonings (though it should be salty enough from the cheese and brine). Spoon sauce over mussels, garnish with herbs and serve hot with crusty bread.

Serves 2.

 

By him: tim philip’s rhubarb fizz

Recipe from The Definitive Drinking Guide by Tim Philip
 
Ingredients
40 ml Tanqueray No. Ten
10ml Pedro Ximenez Sherry
20ml Rhubarb compote
15ml Fresh Lemon juice
10ml Sugar syrup
Dash of egg white
Soda to fill
Contains 17 grams of alcohol per serve
 
Instruction
1. Add all ingredients, minus the soda, to a shaker and dry shake.
2. Add ice and shake for 10 seconds as hard as you can.
3. Strain into a chilled 300ml fizz glass.
4. Top up slowly with soda.
 

By him: spaghetti with seafood velouté

Recipe by Gordon Ramsay from Good Food magazine, May 2010
Ingredients
8 oysters
300g piece skinned salmon fillet
3 large scallops or 6 smaller scallops
6 large raw tiger prawns
500ml fresh fish stock
50g butter
1 large shallot, chopped as finely as possible
200ml white wine or dry vermouth, or half of each
150ml whipping cream
large handful mixed soft herbs including parsley and chives, finely chopped
1 tbsp lemon juice
150g fresh spaghetti
drizzle olive oil
chervil or parsley sprigs, to serve
 
Tip:
Homemade fish stock
You can buy fresh fish stock from some supermarkets, but homemade is best. For the amount needed here, cover about 750g fish bones, sliced onion and leek with a glass of white wine and 1 litre of water. Add a bay leaf and thyme sprigs and bring to the boil. Skim any froth, simmer for 20 mins, then strain.
 
Instructions
  1. Prepare all the seafood by first opening the oysters into a sieve over a bowl to catch the juices. Trim and slice the salmon into 6 equal-size square chunks. If the scallops are large, cut them in half lengthways. Peel and devein the prawns if needed.
  2. Place the strained oyster juice and fish stock into a shallow saucepan and bring to a simmer. First add the salmon and poach for 1 min. Add the prawns and oysters (if using large ones) and poach for 1 min more. Add the scallops and poach for 1 min more, then add the oysters (if small) and simmer everything for a final min until just cooked.
  3. Carefully tip the fish and poaching liquid into a sieve over a large saucepan or bowl, keeping all the salmon chunks intact.
  4. Heat half the butter in the cleaned shallow pan and add the shallot. Cook very gently for 5 mins until soft but not coloured, then pour in the alcohol and boil until reduced to a few tablespoons. Pour in the poaching liquid and boil down until reduced by half, about 20-25 mins. Stir in the cream and, once more, reduce by half. Turn down to a gentle simmer and whisk in the rest of the butter.
  5. Gently add the seafood to the sauce, taking care not to break up the salmon. Simmer lightly until heated through, then add most of the herbs, squeeze over the lemon juice and set aside.
  6. Meanwhile, cook the spaghetti in plenty of boiling water until just done, about 3-4 mins, then drain well and add back to the pan with a drizzle of olive oil and the rest of the herbs. You are now ready to plate up.
  7. Use a roasting fork to twirl a neat bundle of spaghetti. Stand the bundle in the middle of a warm large pasta bowl. Alternate the salmon and seafood around the pasta. Spoon the sauce over the seafood, top the pasta with the chervil or parsley sprigs and serve immediately.

Serves 2

velouté sauce, along with tomato, Hollandaise, Bechamel and espagnole, is one of the sauces of French cuisine that were designated the five “mother sauces” by Auguste Escoffer in the 19th century, which was a simplification of the “Sauce Carême” list of Marie-Antoine Careme. The term velouté is from the French adjectival form ofvelour, meaning velvet.

In preparing a velouté sauce, a light stock (one in which the bones used have not been previously roasted), such as chicken or fish stock, is thickened with a blond roux. Thus the ingredients of a velouté are equal parts by mass butter and flour to form the roux, a light chicken or fish stock, and salt and pepper for seasoning. The sauce produced is commonly referred to by the type of stock used e.g. chicken velouté.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia

By him: rhubarb compote

Recipe by Tim Philip
Ingredients
1 bunch of rhubarb
1/2 water
1/2 cup sugar
1 vanilla pod or 2 star anise
 
Instructions
1.  Take fresh rhubarb stalks, discard any leaves and wash stalks thoroughly
2. Chop stalks into 5cm pieces and put in a saucepan
3. Add half a cup of water, half a cup of sugar and some spice (a split vanilla pod or two star anise work best)
4. Cover and cook on a medium heat until the mix softens and steams (usually around 10 minutes)
5. Remove spices and hand blend until smooth
6. Chill before use

 

By him: snapper en papillote

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Recipe adapted from Chef Danny Grant, a two-starred Michelin chef at the Elysian Hotel in Chicago  (relish.com)
Ingredients
14g + 7g butter, divided
2  cups button mushrooms
2  cloves garlic, minced
1/2  bunch scallions, whites part sliced, greens left whole
2  filets snapper (halibut, black cod, or salmon, any fish)
1/2  bulb fennel, sliced in 16ths
1/2  cup chicken stock
2  tbsp olive oil
2  sprigs thyme
2 slices lemon
 
Instructions
1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees C.
2. Melt 1 tablespoons butter in a small skillet; add mushrooms and sauté until lightly coloured. Add garlic and scallion whites; cook for 3 minutes until tender and remove from heat.
3. Season the fish with salt, pepper and top with lemon slices. 
4. Spread out two pieces of parchment paper and brush the paper with remaining butter. 
5. Divide all ingredients among 2 different sheets of parchment paper (being careful not to let the stock and olive oil spill) and top with the fish.
6. Wrap up the fish using the parchment paper. Bake for 13 minutes. Remove, unwrap the parchment paper and serve.
Tip: this can sit in the fridge for up to four hours until ready to bake. 
 
Serves 2.
 

“En papillote (French for “in parchment”), or al cartoccio in Italian, is a method of cooking in which the food is put into a folded pouch or parcel and then baked.  The parcel is typically made from folded parchment paper, but other material, such as a paper bag or aluminium foil, may be used. The parcel holds in moisture to steam the food. The pocket is created by overlapping circles of aluminum foil and parchment paper and then folding them tightly around the food to create a seal. A papillote should be opened at the table to allow people to smell the aroma when it opens.

The moisture may be from the food itself or from an added moisture source, such as water, wine, or stock.

This method is most often used to cook fish or vegetables, but lamb and  poultry can also be cooked en papillote. Choice of herbs, seasonings and spices depend on the particular recipe being prepared.

The pouch should be sealed with careful folding.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia

 

By him: potato aligot

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Recipe adapted from Easy French Food 
Ingredients
225g potatoes
20g butter
1/4 cup creme fraiche
1/2 clove garlic, minced or pressed
110g tomme cheese, sliced in small strips
Tip 1: DO NOT grate the cheese thinking it will incorporate more rapidly.
 
Instructions
1. Cook the potatoes in boiling water until quite tender (about 20 to 25 minutes).Peel and mash the potatoes.
2. Place a pot on low heat and place the potatoes in this. Using a wooden spoon, begin gradually and vigorously stirring in the cheese bit by bit. Stir in the creme fraiche, butter and garlic.
Tip 2: traditional aligot recipes will tell you to form figure eights while you are doing this, but circle work fine as well. 
Tip 3: keep the heat low as you are adding the cheese. The goal is to keep things just warm enough so that the cheese melts but you don’t want to be cooking anything here.
3. Continue stirring until the potatoes come away from the sides of the pan and you get long smooth ribbons when you lift the spoon through the potatoes. The whole process of incorporating the cheese will take about 10 to 15  minutes.
4. Serve immediately.
 
Serves 2.
 

Aligot is a dish made from melted cheese blended into mashed potatoes (often with some garlic) that is made in L’Aubrac region in southern Massif Central of France. This fondue-like dish from the Aveyron department is a common sight in Auvergne restaurants. Traditionally made with the Tomme de Laguiole or Tomme d’Auvergne cheese, aligot is a French country speciality highly appreciated in the local gastronomy with Toulouse sausages or roast pork. Other cheeses are used in place of Tomme, including mozzarella and cantal. The Laguiole cheese imparts a nutty flavour.

Aligot is made from mashed potatoes blended with butter, cream, crushed garlic, and the melted cheese. The dish is ready when it develops a smooth, elastic texture. 

This dish was originally made using bread by monks, who prepared it for the pilgrims on the way to Santiago de Compostela who stopped for a night in that region. Potatoes were substituted after their introduction to France. Today, it is enjoyed for village gatherings and celebrations as a main dish. Aligot is still cooked by hand in Aveyron, at home as well as in street markets. Aligot is traditionally served with Auvergne red wine.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia

By him: okonomiyaki

Recipe adapted from i-weekly
Ingredients
For batter
150g flour
250ml water
1 egg white (beaten until foamy)
 
For filling
2 cups shredded cabbage
enoki mushroom
1 white onion (diced)
2 eggs
2 tbsp oil
 
For sauce
barbeque sauce
mayonaise sauce
 
Instructions
1. To make the batter, combine the flour, water and egg white in a large mixing bowl, then divide the batter into 2 medium bowls.
2. To make the filling, put half the cabbage, mushroom and onion into each bowl. Make a well in the centre and break an egg into the well. Lightly mix the egg and filling of one bowl together until just blended.
3. Heat the oil in a large skillet, about 45 seconds. Pour the entire batter into the skillet to make one pancake for about 3 minutes until the bottom is golden. Flip the pancake then cook for an additional 2-3 minutes. Flip the pancake 2 more times, until done.
4. Set the pancake on a plate and drizzle with the sauce.
5. Repeat with the remaining bowl.
 
Makes 2 pancakes.
 
“Okonomiyaki (お好み焼き o-konomi-yaki) is a Japanese savoury pancake containing a variety of ingredients. The name is derived from the word okonomi, meaning “what you like” or “what you want”, and yaki meaning “grilled” or “cooked”. Okonomiyaki is mainly associated with the Kansai or Hiroshima areas of Japan, but is widely available throughout the country. Toppings and batters tend to vary according to region. Tokyo okonomiyaki is usually smaller than a Hiroshima or Kansai okonomiyaki. 
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia.”